Palace Tour

Gala Parade Halls

Restoration of the Palace

Rooms of Alexandra

Rooms of Nicholas II

The Children's Floor

Rooms of the Right Wing

Palace Park

The Imperial Garage

Imperial Dining

Plans, Maps and Churches

Imperial Yacht Standardt

Rooms of Alexandra - Pallisander Room

  English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Русский

Le Salon de Palissandre

image 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Ci-dessus : le Salon de Palissandre ou Salon de Bois de rose. Sur le sol, dans le coin gauche, on aperoit le coffre d'Alexandra qui contient ses souvenirs personnels.

Avant la construction du Salon d'Erable, il s'agissait du salon principal des appartements impériaux. Dans ses premiers journaux, Nicolas décrit cette pièce comme le Salon Chippendale. En effet, à l'époque, on considérait la cheminée d'angle en bois, avec ses corniches et ses nombreuses étagères, comme de style Chippendale. Nicolas et Alexandra appréciaient beaucoup cette pièce et c'était l'un des endroits où ils aimaient à se retirer tous les deux, pendant leurs premières années au palais.

Les murs étaient tendus de soie de ton vert pale et le sol recouvert d'une moquette anglaise, avec des motifs en losange et des couronnes, dans des nuances de violet.

Au centre de la pièce pendait un énorme lustre en bronze doré et cristal, de style Empire.

A gauche : la cheminée d'angle du Salon de Palissandre.

Nicolas et Alexandra choisirent personnellement les tableaux de cette pièce et firent en sorte que leur sélection reflète leurs goûts personnels respectifs. Les deux qui se trouvent de part et d'autre de la cheminée avaient été achetés spécialement pour ce salon par l'impératrice. Celui de gauche est une version Art Nouveau de "L'Annonciation". Celui de droite une "Vierge à l'Enfant" de Paul Thuman. Alexandra choisit aussi un portrait de son père, peint par Plueskow en 1894, et un autre de sa mère, la princesse Alice de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande, qui était une copie de Kobervein. Le plus grand tableau du salon était une grande toile représentant le château de Romrod, en Hesse. Il y avait aussi des oeuvres de célèbres artistes russes et une aquarelle du peintre anglais Sir Edward Poynter, qui avait été acquise par Nicolas lors d'un voyage en Grande-Bretagne.

Devant la cheminée se trouve un paravent, sur lequel sont peints en aquarelle les maisons d'enfance d'Alexandra, en Hesse. La cheminée dispose d'un pare-feu et ses étagères sont remplies de porcelaines de la Manufacture Royale de Copenhague. Il y a également, au centre du manteau, une horloge Art Nouveau avec des vitraux de Gallé ou de vitraux russes sur chaque face.

Seuls quelques amis intimes et les personnes auxquelles le tsar ou la tsarine voulaient accorder une faveur spéciale étaient invités dans ce salon, qui faisait partie des appartements privés. La pièce était recouverte de panneaux de bois de rose longuement polis. C'est Meltzer qui dessina sur mesure le mobilier de cette pièce et qui le fit réaliser dans l'atelier de sa famille à Saint-Pétersbourg. Les meubles, tout comme les panneaux muraux, étaient en bois de rose incrusté de délicats motifs. Ce salon était typique des intérieurs anglais de l'époque et ressemblait beaucoup à celui présenté par Bing à l'Exposition Universelle de Paris la même année.

Les intérieurs de style anglais étaient caractérisés par l'utilisation de lambris de bois massifs et de matériaux contrastés pour décorer la pièce. Ici, dans l'interprétation de Meltzer, on retrouve le vieux mouvement anglais Arts and Crafts, mélangé à de subtils éléments du mouvement Art Nouveau. On le voit surtout dans les proportions des meubles et dans l'utilisation de nouveaux motifs décoratifs. On retrouve aussi des sensibilités plus modernes dans la matière utilisée pour tapisser les sièges, ce qui était plus confortables que les chaises empaillées des décennies précédentes. Les étoffes utilisées dans ce salon sont de lourdes tapisseries tissées dans des couleurs Arts and Crafts légèrement adoucies. La moquette anglaise était assortie au sol du Salon Mauve, même si c'était dans des tons différents. Les soieries des murs étaient d'une couleur jaune-vert. Le Salon de Palissandre pouvait facilement servir de salle à manger, aussi bien que de salon, et il arrivait d'ailleurs qu'il remplisse quelquefois cette fonction. C'était souvent ici que la famille prenait son thé quotidien.

A droite: le coin où s'installait la famille dans le Salon de Palissandre, et où furent prises de nombreuses photographies des Romanov. Au mur, on aperoit la grande toile du château de Romrod. Au-dessus, il y a un portrait d'Alexis et à droite un autre représentant la mère d'Alexandra, la princesse Alice.

Alexandra conservait ses souvenirs dans un coffre rempli de ses trésors personnels, dans le coin droit de ce salon, près de la porte menant dans le corridor. Elle y gardait ses vêtements d'enfant, notamment la layette dont elle disposait à Darmstadt, ainsi que des souvenirs de sa grand-mère Victoria. La plupart se trouvent aujourd'hui à Pavlovsk. Elle y rangeait les lettres qu'elle avait écrites à la reine et qu'Edouard VII lui avait renvoyées à la mort de Victoria en 1901. Il y avait aussi ses journaux intimes et les lettres d'amour que Nicolas lui avait écrit lorsqu'il lui faisait la cour.

Dans ce salon, il y avait également beaucoup d'objets de la Maison Fabergé, notamment un coffre en argent et en palissandre dans le style Art Nouveau, qu'Alexandra aimait beaucoup.

La pièce disposait aussi de deux téléphones, l'un vers l'extérieur, l'autre relié directement au Palais d'Hiver. Celui-ci servit beaucoup pendant les jours sombres de la révolution alors qu'Alexandra était seule au palais avec ses enfants et qu'elle gardait ainsi contact avec le Commandant du Palais d'Hiver, le Général Ressin.

Bob Atchison

Traduction: Thomas Ménard, mai 2004

Vous pouvez envoyer vos commentaires sur cet article au traducteur Thomas Ménard

Please send your comments on this page and the Time Machine to boba@pallasweb.com

Memories of Aleksei Volkov I Visit the Soviets by E. M. Delafield Lost Splendor by Felix Yussupov
Palace Zooms Imperial Bedroom
Imperial Bedroom
Portrait Hall
Portrait Hall
Mauve Room
Mauve Room
Maple Room
Maple Room
Aleksey's Bedroom
Aleksey's Bedroom
Nicholas's Study
Nicholas's Study
Aleksey's Playroom
Aleksey's Playroom
Formal Reception
Formal Reception
Balcony View
Balcony View
Aleksey- Balcony
Aleksey- Balcony
Children-Mauve
Children-Mauve
Nicholas's Bathroom
Nicholas's Bathroom
Alexandra- Mauve
Alexandra- Mauve
Nicholas's Reception
Nicholas's Reception
Tsarskoe Selo Map
Tsarskoe Selo Map
Pallasart Photo Tours Palace Blog About The Site Palace, Russia & Royalty Forum Main Menu